Miscarriage Information

You might know that vaginal bleeding is a common symptom of a miscarriage, but did you know that bleeding doesn't always mean a miscarriage has occurred? Spotting and cramping can be normal during pregnancy. The key is knowing what to look for in terms of bleeding, blood clots, abdominal pain (stomach pain), and so on.
 
(Click How Do I Know If I've Had a Miscarriage? to learn more about possible signs and symptoms, the different types of miscarriages, and when to contact your healthcare provider.)
 
In the unfortunate event that a miscarriage does occur, you may be wondering where you go from here. How soon can you try to become pregnant again? Does having one miscarriage increase your risk for another one? While each woman's situation is different, in general, it will take several weeks for your body to return to normal. Emotional pain is a given, but don't be surprised if there is some physical pain as well in the form of cramping and breast tenderness.
 
One of the most important things to keep in mind is that in the vast majority of cases, a miscarriage happens because something was wrong with the fetus. This is something that is out of your control, and you did not cause this to happen. Give yourself time to heal, and after a couple of menstrual cycles, you can probably start trying to become pregnant again.
 
(Click I Have Had a Miscarriage -- What Happens Next? for more information on what to expect as your body heals, treatment options, the emotional impact, and more.)
 

Miscarriage Information

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