Pregnancy Articles A-Z

Prenate Elite Side Effects - Sex After Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Pregnancy Articles containing information on subjects from Prenate Elite Side Effects to Sex After Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Prenate Elite Side Effects
    Side effects of Prenate Elite may include headaches, nausea, and gas. This eMedTV page lists other Prenate Elite side effects (including those that require medical care) and explains why it may be difficult to tell what is causing the side effects.
  • Prenate Elite Uses
    This eMedTV page explains that Prenate Elite is specifically designed for supplementing certain vitamins and minerals that may be lacking in a pregnant woman's diet. This page covers other Prenate Elite uses, such as for women who are breastfeeding.
  • Prenate Elite Warnings and Precautions
    Prenate Elite contains folic acid, which can mask certain types of anemia. This eMedTV article discusses other Prenate Elite warnings and precautions you should be aware of before taking the prenatal vitamins, such as potential drug interactions.
  • Prenate Essential
    Prenate Essential is a type of prenatal vitamin prescribed to provide important nutrients during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page examines the benefits of this vitamin, explains how it works, and lists potential side effects. It also links to more details.
  • Prenate Essential and Breastfeeding
    Nursing women are often advised to take Prenate Essential or other prenatal vitamins. As this eMedTV page explains, breastfeeding is a time of increased nutritional need, and Prenate Essential can help provide beneficial vitamins and minerals.
  • Prenate Essential Causing Nausea
    Could Prenate Essential be causing your nausea? This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at some of the possible reactions to this product and explains what to do if you experience severe nausea or vomiting. A link to more details is also included.
  • Prenate Essential Dosage
    The standard dose for Prenate Essential is the same for all women -- one capsule taken once daily. This eMedTV page takes a look at some of the recommendations for taking this prenatal vitamin, including how to minimize stomach upset from this product.
  • Prenate Essential Drug Interactions
    Advil, certain antibiotics, and various other products may cause drug interactions with Prenate Essential. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that may interfere with this prenatal vitamin and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Prenate Essential Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, overdosing on Prenate Essential can be quite dangerous, and could lead to iron poisoning. This article explores other possible overdose effects and explains how any resulting symptoms may be treated.
  • Prenate Essential Prenatal Vitamins
    Are you looking for information on Prenate Essential? This eMedTV page features a brief overview of this prenatal vitamin, including how Prenate Essential can support a healthy pregnancy and how to take it.
  • Prenate Essential Side Effects
    Possible Prenate Essential side effects include headaches, constipation, and drowsiness. This eMedTV segment features a more detailed list of potential problems that may occur and also explains which ones may require immediate medical treatment.
  • Prenate Essential Uses
    As a prenatal vitamin, Prenate Essential can help fill the nutritional gaps in the diet of pregnant women. This eMedTV article explores a number of the benefits of taking this prescription prenatal vitamin and explains how this product works.
  • Prenate Essential Warnings and Precautions
    If you have anemia or a bleeding disorder, make sure your doctor knows before you take Prenate Essential. This eMedTV article contains other precautions and warnings for Prenate Essential and addresses whether this product is safe for breastfeeding women.
  • Prenate Mini
    Prenate Mini is a prenatal vitamin taken by women to help support a healthy pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page contains information on how these vitamins provide important nutrients. It also covers dosing, side effects, and various other topics.
  • Prenate Mini and Breastfeeding
    Women who are breastfeeding may benefit from using Prenate Mini. This eMedTV Web selection explains how this prenatal vitamin is generally considered safe and beneficial for women who are nursing. It also covers whether you may need additional vitamins.
  • Prenate Mini Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, the standard Prenate Mini dosage is one softgel capsule taken once a day. This page takes a look at some of the recommendations for taking this prenatal vitamin, with tips on how to reduce stomach upset.
  • Prenate Mini Drug Interactions
    Thyroid medicines, blood-thinning drugs, and other products may cause interactions with Prenate Mini. This eMedTV Web page outlines other products that may react with this prenatal vitamin and describes the potential complications that might occur.
  • Prenate Mini Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, if someone overdoses on Prenate Mini, it could lead to vomiting, unusual bleeding, or kidney stones. This page lists other possible symptoms and explains some of the ways a doctor may treat these complications.
  • Prenate Mini Prenatal Vitamin Information
    Make sure to review information on Prenate Mini, as this prenatal vitamin may not be safe for some women. This eMedTV resource presents a brief overview of this prescription vitamin, with details on its beneficial effects, dosing instructions, and more.
  • Prenate Mini Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Prenate Mini may cause side effects such as headaches, insomnia, and heartburn. This article gives a more detailed list of potential side effects, including those requiring immediate medical treatment.
  • Prenate Mini Uses
    If you are pregnant, trying to conceive, or nursing, you may benefit from using Prenate Mini. This eMedTV page examines the benefits of this prescription vitamin, including how women who use Prenate Mini can help reduce birth defects and other problems.
  • Prenate Mini Warnings and Precautions
    If you have a bleeding disorder or are allergic to fish, Prenate Mini may not be appropriate for you. This eMedTV page covers precautions for using Prenate Mini safely, including warnings for women who are taking certain drugs or have certain allergies.
  • Prenatel Care
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, prenatal care is important to help ensure a safe pregnancy for you and your baby. This page also offers tips for providing good prenatal care. Prenatel care is a common misspelling of squamous prenatal care.
  • Prenatel Vitamins
    Prenatal vitamins are an important source of vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy pregnancy. This eMedTV page describes possible benefits and side effects of these vitamins. Prenatel vitamins is a common misspelling of prenatal vitamins.
  • Prenetal Care
    Good prenatal care is important to help ensure a safe pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV site describes what to do if you think you are pregnant and offers tips on providing good prenatal care. Prenetal care is a common misspelling of prenatal care.
  • Prenetal Vitamins
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses, prenatal vitamins are an important source of nutrients for women who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or trying to conceive. Prenetal vitamins is a common misspelling of prenatal vitamins.
  • PreNexa
    PreNexa is a vitamin commonly prescribed to pregnant or breastfeeding women. This article from the eMedTV site explores the benefits of this prenatal vitamin, explains how it works, and lists some of the potential side effects of this supplement.
  • PreNexa and Breastfeeding
    It is suggested that breastfeeding women take PreNexa or other prenatal vitamins. As this eMedTV page explains, breastfeeding is a time of increased nutritional need; PreNexa contains vitamins and minerals that are important for a mother and her baby.
  • PreNexa Dosage
    As with other prenatal vitamins, there is only one standard recommended dose for PreNexa. As this eMedTV Web page explains, the recommended dosage for use before, during, and after pregnancy is one softgel capsule once a day.
  • PreNexa Drug Interactions
    Aspirin, certain antibiotics, and various other medications may cause drug interactions with PreNexa. This eMedTV resource explains what other medicines may interfere with PreNexa and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • PreNexa Overdose
    An overdose of PreNexa may lead to iron poisoning, which could cause fever, flushing, or seizures. This eMedTV segment further explores the possible effects of an overdose and explains how an overdose of this prenatal vitamin can be treated.
  • Prenexa Prenatal Vitamin Information
    As this eMedTV segment explains, PreNexa is a prenatal vitamin that contains DHA and a stool softener. This article offers an overview of PreNexa, with information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider. A link to more details is also provided.
  • PreNexa Side Effects
    Potential side effects of PreNexa include headaches, loss of appetite, and constipation. This part of the eMedTV Web site provides a more detailed list of possible side effects and also explains which problems may require medical attention.
  • PreNexa Uses
    PreNexa is approved for filling in any nutritional gaps in the diet of pregnant women. This eMedTV resource describes the benefits of taking this prenatal vitamin, discusses possible off-label uses for PreNexa, and explains how the supplement works.
  • PreNexa Warnings and Precautions
    If you have a bleeding disorder, make sure your doctor is aware before he or she prescribes you PreNexa. This eMedTV segment includes other precautions and warnings for PreNexa and explains whether this product is safe for breastfeeding women.
  • Prental Care
    As this eMedTV resource explains, prenatal care is important to help ensure the safety of yourself and your baby. This page also offers tips on providing good prenatal care throughout your pregnancy. Prental care is a common misspelling of prenatal care.
  • Prental Vitamins
    Prenatal vitamins provide several benefits for women who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or trying to conceive. This eMedTV page describes possible benefits and side effects of these vitamins. Prental vitamins is a common misspelling of prenatal vitamins.
  • Preparing for a Cesarean Section
    Planned cesarean sections are often scheduled near the 39th week of pregnancy. This eMedTV resource explains the importance of knowing the signs of labor, such as severe pain or having your water break, even when preparing for a cesarean section.
  • Preparing for a Postpartum Tubal Ligation
    As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, preparing for a postpartum tubal ligation involves not eating or drinking after midnight on the night before your surgery. This article also offers other tips on preparing for your tubal ligation.
  • Preparing for Laparoscopic Surgery
    To prepare for laparoscopic surgery, you can't eat or drink anything for several hours before the procedure. This eMedTV page explains what you should do when preparing for laparoscopic surgery and what you may experience on the day of the procedure.
  • Prepedil
    Prepidil is a drug licensed to help prepare a woman's cervix for childbirth. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of what to expect when receiving this medicine and provides a link to more details. Prepedil is a common misspelling of Prepidil.
  • Prepidil
    Available by prescription only, Prepidil is approved to help ripen the cervix at the time of delivery. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this medicine, with details on how it works, how it is administered, safety precautions, and more.
  • Prepidil and Breastfeeding
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, women are unlikely to receive Prepidil (dinoprostone vaginal gel) while breastfeeding, as this drug is only approved for use during delivery. This page explains whether this drug could cause problems after childbirth.
  • Prepidil and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article explains that even though Prepidil (dinoprostone vaginal gel) is a pregnancy Category C drug, it is only approved for use in pregnant women. This page describes why this is the case and lists problems it caused during animal studies.
  • Prepidil Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the Prepidil dosing guidelines are the same for every woman. This resource examines when and how this medicine will be administered. It also discusses some important considerations to be aware of when receiving this drug.
  • Prepidil Drug Interactions
    Although Prepidil is not likely to interfere with many medications, this drug does interact with oxytocin. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this particular drug interaction with Prepidil and explains what your doctor may do to avoid complications.
  • Prepidil Medication Information
    Prepidil is used in pregnant women to soften and dilate the cervix before labor and delivery. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on this prescription medication, including how Prepidil is given and why it may not be suitable for some women.
  • Prepidil Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV page, an overdose of Prepidil (dinoprostone vaginal gel) may cause unusually strong uterine contractions that lead to fetal distress. This page takes an in-depth look at other possible overdose symptoms and treatment options.
  • Prepidil Side Effects
    A low fetal heart rate and abnormal uterine contractions are possible Prepidil side effects. This eMedTV page outlines a number of other reactions that were reported in clinical studies of the drug. A list of potentially serious problems is also included.
  • Prepidil Uses
    A doctor may prescribe Prepidil to thin and soften the cervix so the baby can pass through during birth. This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at what Prepidil is used for and how this vaginal gel works to prepare a woman's cervix for delivery.
  • Prepidil Warnings and Precautions
    You should not receive Prepidil if you have an overactive uterus or had a previous C-section. This eMedTV segment lists other safety precautions you should be aware of with Prepidil, including warnings of potentially serious complications that may occur.
  • Prescription Medications and Pregnancy
    Is it safe to take prescription drugs during pregnancy? This eMedTV segment offers in-depth information on how medications, both prescription and nonprescription, are classified under different categories to help ensure your safety -- and your baby's.
  • Prescription Prenatal Vitamins
    Typically, prescription prenatal vitamins contain more folic acid than non-prescription prenatal vitamins. This eMedTV Web page discusses other differences between prescription and non-prescription prenatal vitamins (such as ingredients and cost).
  • Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
    The guaranteed way of preventing fetal alcohol syndrome is for the mother to avoid alcohol during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page offers more tips on preventing the disorder, including information on where to find help.
  • PrimaCare
    PrimaCare and PrimaCare One are prenatal vitamins that are available by prescription. This eMedTV Web page describes these products in more detail, explains the benefits of taking prenatal vitamins, and offers dosing information for the drug.
  • PrimaCare and Breastfeeding
    It can be beneficial for breastfeeding women to take prenatal vitamins such as PrimaCare. This page from the eMedTV archives offers more information on PrimaCare and breastfeeding, and explains why taking vitamins can be helpful during this time.
  • PrimaCare Dosage
    The recommended PrimaCare dosage is one soft gel in the morning and one tablet in the evening. This part of the eMedTV library also offers dosing guidelines for PrimaCare One and includes suggestions for when and how to take the prenatal vitamin.
  • PrimaCare Interactions
    Certain drugs, such as aspirin or bisphosphonates, may potentially interact with PrimaCare. Interactions, as this eMedTV page explains, can prevent medicines from absorbing into the body. This page lists other drugs that can interact with PrimaCare.
  • PrimaCare Overdose
    A PrimaCare overdose may cause iron poisoning, which could lead to dizziness, headache, or seizures. This eMedTV resource lists other possible signs of iron poisoning and describes the treatment options that are available in case of overdose.
  • PrimaCare Prenatal Vitamins
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, PrimaCare is a line of prescription prenatal vitamins. This article gives some dosing information for the two types of PrimaCare and lists the omega-3 fatty acids they contain.
  • PrimaCare Side Effects
    Potential PrimaCare side effects include loss of appetite, flushing, and constipation. This eMedTV page lists other side effects that have been seen with individual components of PrimaCare and explains which problems may require medical attention.
  • PrimaCare Uses
    PrimaCare and PrimaCare One are vitamins that are used for boosting nourishment in pregnant women. This eMedTV resource discusses PrimaCare uses in more detail and explains the importance of adding vitamins to your diet during pregnancy.
  • PrimaCare Warnings and Precautions
    PrimaCare products contain folic acid, which can mask certain types of anemia. This eMedTV page includes other important PrimaCare warnings and precautions, and lists certain conditions that you should tell your doctor about before taking it.
  • Problems During Pregnancy
    What are some of the problems that can occur during pregnancy? This eMedTV Web page talks about nausea, placental abruption, and other problems that may occur. This article also includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Reasons for a C-section -- Placenta Previa
    Placenta previa happens in about 1 out of 200 pregnancies. This video clip offers an overview of this condition.
  • Reasons for a Cesarean Section -- Abnormal Presentation
    This video segment explains why abnormal presentation may make a c-section necessary.
  • Reasons for a Cesarean Section -- Large Baby
    This video explains that your doctor may recommend a c-section if your baby is too large.
  • Reasons for a Cesarean Section -- Medical Conditions
    This multimedia clip explains the medical conditions that can require a cesarean section.
  • Reasons for a Cesarean Section -- Multiple Pregnancy
    This video clip talks about why your healthcare provider is recommending a cesarean delivery.
  • Reasons for a Cesarean Section -- Placental Abruption
    This clip offers an overview of placental abruption.
  • Reasons for a Cesarean Section -- Previous Scar From A Cesarean Birth
    This video clip discusses how your previous scar can affect a future cesarean section.
  • Recommending Laparoscopic Surgery for an Ectopic Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains why a doctor may recommend laparoscopic surgery for ectopic pregnancy. Before recommending this procedure, however, your healthcare provider will ask about your symptoms and medical history, and perform a physical exam.
  • Recovery Time for Tubal Ligation
    As you recover from tubal ligation, you may experience pain, chills, nausea, and other symptoms. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at the recovery process and what you can expect during the recovery time for tubal ligation.
  • Remaining Ectopic Tissue (Laparoscopy For Ectopic Pregnancy Risks)
    This video explains why there may be some remaining ectopic tissue after your surgery.
  • Remaining Ectopic Tissue Following Laparoscopy
    Sometimes, there is remaining ectopic tissue following laparoscopy. The information in this section of the eMedTV library explains why there may be tissue remaining following the procedure and how this is usually treated.
  • Second Trimester
    During the second trimester of pregnancy, the baby's features are formed and major organs develop. This eMedTV resource discusses this trimester in detail, including signs of pre-term labor, diagnostic tests, and symptoms like stretch marks.
  • Sex After Pregnancy
    After your baby is born, you may be wondering when you can have sex again. This eMedTV page covers sex after pregnancy, explaining that most women generally must wait at least six weeks. This page also addresses issues that may affect your sex life.
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